Category Archives: Guest Post

Guest Post on Bob’s Red Mill with a Recipe for Quinoa and Happy Fiji Day and Thanksgiving

Dear Readers,

In my last post when I told you all that I am away in Fiji, I forgot to mention in it that I guest posted on the Bob’s Red Mill blog with a recipe for Broccolini, Corn, and Shrimp Quinoa with Olive Oil Lemon Garlic Dressing last week. I tweeted the link and posted it on Facebook, though I thought I would mention it here for those of you who aren’t on Twitter or Facebook and might have missed it.

Remember, if you’re looking for a particular recipe, or you’re just browsing, you can always check out the ever-expanding recipe index.

Tomorrow (Monday, October 10th) is Fiji Day, celebrating Fiji’s independence from the British for forty-one years and all the celebrations this weekend are leading up to it. (My Dad told us that, thankfully, Fiji’s independence was non-violent and was a generally peaceful affair.)

As it is also the Canadian Thanksgiving long weekend, I wish all my readers a Happy Thanksgiving and Happy Fiji Day! :)

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James’ Maple Balsamic Salad Dressing

My brother’s been going to UBC Farm‘s Farm Wonders program since early April, every other week. UBC Farm is the only organic farm in the city of Vancouver, B.C. and is entirely student-run. It has been a lot of fun for all of us, as we learn about the plants and their growing cycles, insects that are helpful and harmful to the plants, etc.

Last week we harvested lettuce for salad. I have both read and heard that lettuce is very easy to grow and grows quickly, but I genuinely had no idea before just how quickly. I was amazed.

Bread was also made, and although it wasn’t gluten-free it was still fun – the wheat is freshly milled and ground into flour, so all the better. Later we also went to visit the free range chickens (a controlled study, so feeding the chickens wasn’t allowed) and collected seven eggs; the eggs are sold at their farmer’s market and when they have their children’s summer camp, the eggs are used for cooking and baking by the children.

One of the boys, James, in my brother’s gardening class made a wonderful, magnificent salad dressing for the harvested lettuce, freshly picked from the garden. This was what was left of the dressing.

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We also thought it would be a lovely marinade for chicken or pork. It was so good that we had to ask what he used to make the dressing and if it would be okay to share his creation here, which he said yes to – thank you, James!

See more photos of UBC Farm after the recipe!

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Dark Chocolate Peanut Butter Banana Cake with Quinoa Flour (GFCF)

A dear family friend of ours, who also happens to be my brother’s OT (Occupational Therapist) made this cake. Dimity Duckworth is such an outstanding OT and truly wonderful person that she has long since captured a place in the heart of our family and almost everyone she meets, I am sure!  The recipe that she made the cake from calls it bread, but we’re calling it cake. I liked it so much that I simply had to share it with all of you, here. It reminds me of my grandmother’s banana bread, even though peanut butter was never used in her bread (but sometimes there were chocolate chips).

This cake uses quinoa flour, a flour I’ve yet to use in my baking (I have full intentions to, though, since I got that quinoa cookbook!) and she found it a bit heavier than rice flour, which is  what she usually uses but it does add a pleasant, complimentary nuttiness to the cake. Because it’s dense it’s a great snack cake and very satisfying – I cut a slice in half, like in the picture above, and it was enough to still satisfy me.

An interesting fact Dimity told me is that peanut butter isn’t popular to bake with in Australia, so, in her words, she’s really into using it. Since she mentioned it, it has struck me that I have not seen the PB in the Donna Hay magazine or her cookbooks that I’ve borrowed from the library. Is baking with peanut butter very (North) American? (I include North because it seems to be used quite a bit in Canadian baking also.)

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