Dorayaki 10

Gluten-Free Dorayaki (SCD & GFCF)

I am posting this recipe today as a thank you to Tess of Tess’s Japanese Kitchen, who helped me set up the new visual category list in the left sidebar.

Dorayaki is a Japanese confection or wa-gashi and is essentially a pancake sandwich. The filling is a red bean filling called anko, which is usually made with adzuki beans (rich in iron) but I’ve also made it with red kidney beans. My recipe is based off the recipe from About.com. This is a simple and filling, fairly quick snack to make.

Ingredients

Anko (red bean filling)

1 (14-fluid ounce or 398 ml) tin red kidney beans, or 1 1/2 cups cooked
1/4 cup honey or to taste
1 tsp. salt or to taste

Pancakes

1 cup almond flour
1/2 tsp. baking soda
2 or 3 eggs
1/4 cup water
1/8 to 1/4 cup honey, or to taste

Oil to fry pancakes (I used olive oil, but you can use coconut oil or any oil that you prefer to fry with)

Method:

Anko

Drain and rinse the tinned kidney beans until all the bubbles are gone. Transfer the beans to a small saucepan and add honey and salt, mixing well. Gently cook over medium heat for about 5 to 10 minutes, just enough to warm the mixture. Remove from heat and blend with an electric hand-held blender until it’s become a paste. Makes about 1 cup.

Pancakes

  1. Heat a fry pan over medium heat with a little oil. In a bowl, combine the almond flour, baking soda, and eggs until it forms a paste-like mixture. Add the water, little at a time, until it reaches a batter consistency. Pour and mix in honey.
  2. Pour a small amount of the pancake batter to form 4-inch pancakes into the pan and cook until the edges start becomes firm while the surface is set but still wet. Another indicator of when it’s ready to be flipped is when you stop hearing it sizzling. Because of the honey, the pancakes cook quickly. Flip over and cook for a few minutes more, until golden brown. Pancakes may puff up a bit. Repeat until all the batter has been used. Makes 10 pancakes.

Assembly

To start, spoon a small amount of the anko paste on to one pancake, spreading evenly. Put more of the bean paste on, if you want. To finish, put another pancake on top, making a sandwich. Serve and enjoy!

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9 thoughts on “Gluten-Free Dorayaki (SCD & GFCF)

  1. Tess

    Hi Z!

    Oh! Thank you for the link / recip

    ! I have heard of doriyaki but have never made them myself. Your recipe here looks as though I could adapt it to be Kosher for Passover! Tell me what “almond flour” is?

    I don’t have much of a sweet-tooth, but I usually make Joan Nathan’s ‘almond macaroons’ where one grinds blanched almonds very finely. Would that work?

    I have made anko from adzuki beans: lots of work to get rid of the bean skins so it is smooth, smooth, smooth; but it’s nice because you can control the sweetness. Buying canned anko is much easier. :P There is also a version made with white beans: koshi an. White kidney beans. (cannellini beans?) You can also buy that in cans or shelf-stable bags.

    Beans would not be k for p, but I’ve seen recipes using sweetened mashed chestnuts for sweets in Japan. Fresh or frozen: they might be kosher. And sometimes Japanese sweet potatoes are used for sweets.

    I’m glad for inspiration!
    Tess

    Reply
    1. Z's Cup of Tea

      Hi Tess,

      Yes, almond flour is just finely ground almonds, and the nuts can be blanched or not. (I use blanched almond flour.) Anko made with white beans sounds intriguing – perhaps I will try that kind next time! Thank you for the suggestion.

      Reply
  2. Yumi Zumi

    Dear Tess.

    I am a Japanese mother of Autistic boy. This is a great recepi!
    I hate to tell my son ” Sorry, Although your sister can eat this one but you are not….”
    We made this Dorayaki and enjoy tea time with all family!
    Thanks!!!!

    Reply

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